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Quotes of C.T. Studd

C.T. Studd (1860-1931) was born with a silver spoon in his mouth.

Coming from a wealthy family, and privileged with an education at Eton and Cambridge, C.T. Studd would eventually play cricket for England’s national team.

However, God intervened in his life in saving grace. He was converted to Christ as a young man and, rather than pursue wealth, fame and worldly honour, he devoted his life to Christ on the mission field – for the glory of God and in the interests of the salvation of his fellow men and women.

The challenge of his weighty sayings, some of which are reproduced below, continues to impact the lives of thousands to this day:

“How could I spend the best years of my life in living for the honours of this world, when thousands of souls are perishing every day?”

“The ‘romance’ of a missionary is often made up of monotony and drudgery; there often is no glamour in it; it doesn’t stir a man’s spirit or blood. So don’t come out to be a missionary as an experiment, it is useless and dangerous. Only come if you feel you would rather die than not come. Lord Wolsey was right: ‘A missionary ought to be a fanatic or he encumbers the ground’. There are many trials and hardships. Disappointments are numerous and the time of learning the language is especially trying. Don’t come if you want to make a great name or want to live long. Come if you feel there is no greater honour, after living for Christ, than to die for Him.”

“Some wish to live within the sound of Church or Chapel bell; I want to run a rescue shop within a yard of Hell.”

“If Jesus Christ be God and died for me, then no sacrifice can be too great for me to make for Him”.

“Christ’s call is to save the lost, not the stiff-necked; He came not to call scoffers but sinners to repentance; not to build and furnish comfortable chapels, churches, and cathedrals at home in which to rock Christian professors to sleep by means of clever essays, stereotyped prayers, and artistic musical performances, but to capture men from the devil’s clutches and the very jaws of Hell. This can be accomplished only by a red-hot, unconventional, unfettered devotion, in the power of the Holy Spirit, to the Lord Jesus Christ.”

C.T. Studd’s poem, “Only One Life”, contains the following 8 verses:

Two little lines I heard one day, travelling along life’s busy way; bringing conviction to my heart, and from my mind would not depart; only one life, ’twill soon be past, only what’s done for Christ will last.

Only one life, yes only one, soon will its fleeting hours be done; then, in ‘that day’ my Lord to meet, and stand before His judgement seat; only one life, ’twill soon be past, only what’s done for Christ will last.

Only one life, the still small voice, gently pleads for a better choice; bidding me selfish aims to leave, and to God’s holy will to cleave; only one life, ’twill soon be past, only what’s done for Christ will last.

Only one life, a few brief years, each with its burdens, hopes, and fears; each with its days I must fulfil, living for self or in His will; only one life, ’twill soon be past, only what’s done for Christ will last.

When this bright world would tempt me sore, when Satan would a victory score; when self would seek to have its way, then help me Lord with joy to say; only one life, ’twill soon be past, only what’s done for Christ will last.

Give me Father, a purpose deep, in joy or sorrow Thy word to keep; faithful and true whate’er the strife,
pleasing Thee in my daily life; only one life, ’twill soon be past, only what’s done for Christ will last.

Oh let my love with fervour burn, and from the world now let me turn; living for Thee, and Thee alone,
bringing Thee pleasure on Thy throne; only one life, ’twill soon be past, only what’s done for Christ will last.

Only one life, yes only one, now let me say, “Thy will be done”; and when at last I’ll hear the call, I know I’ll say “‘Twas worth it all”; only one life, ’twill soon be past, only what’s done for Christ will last.”